Oat Crepes with Harissa Beans and Tomatoes

Oat Crepes with Harissa Beans and Tomatoes


This post is sponsored by Bob’s Red Mill.

About this time of year, my meals revolve around the easiest way to eat as much summer produce. Typically the answers to that are grain bowls, but I like to change it occasionally, like with these oat crepes.

Tomatoes

In our produce pick-up and even in our small garden, cherry tomatoes are the summer winner. During peak tomato season, we end up with a large mound each week, and the tomatoes find their way into everything. However, I love a good meal that highlights the flavor and sweetness of the cherry tomatoes.

You could use regular tomatoes in this recipe by cutting the tomato into bite-size pieces. A lightly cooked squash would be another excellent addition as well. If it’s not summer, the harissa/crepe combination would be nice with roasted squash or sweet potato.

Crepes

When it comes to crepes, I love that they are so forgiving with whichever flour you might use. In terms of these oat crepes, I used Bob’s Red Mill rolled oats and pulsed them in a blender to make the flour for the crepes. We always have rolled oats on hand, and the crepes hold together well. If you’re looking for other options, here is a post on how I make basic crepes.

Harissa Paste

I keep an ample supply of dried chile peppers on hand during the year, primarily to make different versions of chile pastes and salsas. Harissa paste has become a staple in my cooking over the years. I love this North African condiment because it’s versatile: a base for a recipe or the final added touch. You can find quality harissa pastes in many grocery stores that come in either jar or squeeze tubes.

If you’re looking to source a harissa paste, I’d recommend these ones. You can also try making a version at home (this is the recipe I use), but know it won’t be quite the same. Tunisian harissa is made with specific chiles grown in the region.

Beans

Finally, the beans. This recipe isn’t really about them, but the beans add heft to make these crepes a meal. I used a version of cannellini, but any variety of white bean or chickpea would work. Use what you have on hand if you can.

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Oat Crepes with Harissa Beans and Tomatoes


Scale

Ingredients

Crepes

60g Bob’s Red Mill Rolled Oats (about ½ cup)

2 large eggs

¼ teaspoon sea salt

½ cup (120ml) milk 

1 tablespoon butter (12g), melted and cooled

Whipped Feta

1 ½ ounces (40g) feta cheese

2 tablespoons (5g) cream cheese, softened 

2 tablespoons (20g) whole milk

Tomatoes

1 teaspoon (4g) to 1 tablespoon (12g) harissa paste (see note)

2 tablespoons (24g) unsalted butter

1 cup (90g) sliced cherry tomatoes

½ cup (115g) cooked white beans, drained of any liquid (and rinsed if using canned)

Salt, to taste


Instructions

  • To make the crepes, place the rolled oats in a high-speed blender and process until the oats have turned into a flour consistency. Add in the eggs, salt, milk, and butter then rerun the blender until the crepe batter is well combined.
  • Heat 8″ skillet over medium-low heat and lightly grease with butter. Place a scant ¼ cup of batter in pan. Tilt/swirl the pan so that the batter covers the entire bottom of the pan in a thin layer. 
  • Cook for about 30 to 60 seconds, until the edges begin to peel away from the sides of the pan and look golden. Flip and cook for another 20 to 30 seconds. Adjust heat higher/lower depending on how fast the crepe is cooking. Layer finished crepes, slightly overlapping, on a plate.
  • Once the crepes finish, crumble the feta into a bowl and add the cream cheese and milk. Stir to combine, then whip vigorously to lighten the mixture slightly.
  •  Finally, melt the butter in a small pan and add the harissa. Cook just to warm.

Notes

  • Most of the store-bought harissa pastes I’ve tried are on the hotter side to where I’d probably recommend only using a teaspoon or so. I make a harissa paste that’s more on the mild side, which means I can use a bit more. 
  • Use leftover crepes for dessert, breakfast, or freeze for later use.

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